Fate

Overview
When creating a character, come up with aspects as per FATE rules (below):
  • 1 High Concept Aspect (Should be linked to Edges or Hindrances).
  • 1 Trouble Aspect (can be linked to Edges or Hindrances).
  • 1 to 3 more Aspects if needed.
You can change or add an Aspect every time you gain an Advance (5exp), a new edge or hindrance or some other of loss of sanity, permanent injury, etc.
You can add a new Aspect every time you gain a new Rank.
You start each gaming session with 2 Fate Points that can not be used for the purposes of combat. You can spend a point to:
  • Invoke an Aspect for a +2 bonus to a roll.
  • Invoke an Aspect to state a fact in the game world.
The GM can compel player's Aspect to complicate the situation. The player can:
  • Accept the compel and get a Fate Point.
  • Discard a FP to prevent the complication. 
Players can suggest compels for other players also!
 
Fate Points
Fate points (FP) are different to Bennies in that they are used outside of combat to progress the character's story and make the gaming world more interesting.
You start with 2 FP every scenario you can use to influence the game. When your aspects come into play, you will usually spend or gain a fate point.
You can spend fate points to invoke an aspect or to declare a story detail. You earn fate points by accepting a compel on one of your aspects.

Aspects
Aspects are phrases that describe some significant detail about a character. They are the reasons why your character matters, why we’re interested in seeing your character in the game.
Aspects can cover a wide range of elements, such as personality or descriptive traits, beliefs, relationships, issues and problems, or anything else that helps us invest in the character as a person. Where possible, Aspects should be directly linked to the character's Edges and Hindrances, rather than just a collection of stats.
Aspects can describe things that are beneficial or detrimental—in fact, the best aspects are both (much like Edges and Hindrances). Aspects don’t just belong to characters; the environment your characters are in can have aspects attached to it as well.
Aspects come into play in conjunction with Fate Points.
When an Aspect benefits you, you can spend a Fate Point to Invoke that aspect to manipulate a story detail to you advantage.When your Aspects complicate your character’s life, you gain a Fate Point back—this is called accepting a Compel.
 
Invoking An Aspect
Sometimes, you want to add a detail that works to your character’s advantage in a scene. For example, you might use this to narrate a convenient coincidence, like retroactively having the right supplies for a certain job (“Of course I brought that along!”), showing up at a dramatically appropriate moment, or suggesting that you and the NPC you just met have mutual clients in common.
To do this, you’ll spend a FP. You should try to justify your story details by relating them to your aspects. GMs have the right to veto any suggestions that seem out of scope or ask the player to revise them, especially if the rest of the group isn’t buying into it.
Example:
Gurnig the Arcane gets captured with his friends by some tribesfolk from the Norscan wilds. The three heroes are unceremoniously dumped before the Jarl, and the GM describes the Jarl addressing them in a strange, garbled tongue. The player looks at his sheet and says, “Hey, I have 'If I Haven’t Been There, I’ve Read About It' on my sheet. Can I declare that I’ve studied this language at some point, so we can communicate?” The GM thinks that’s perfectly reasonable to assume. The player tosses over a FP and describes Gurnig answering in the Jarl’s own speech, which turns all eyes in the village (including those of his friends) on him in a moment of surprise. Gurnig looks at his friends and say, “Books. They’re good for you.”
 
Compels
Sometimes (in fact, probably often), you’ll find yourself in a situation where an aspect complicates your character’s life and creates unexpected drama. When that happens, the GM will suggest a potential complication that might arise. This is called a compel.
Sometimes, a compel means your character automatically fails at some goal, or your character’s choices are restricted, or simply that unintended consequences cloud whatever your character does. You might negotiate back and forth on the details to arrive at what would be most appropriate and dramatic in the moment.
Once you’ve agreed to accept the complication, you get a FP for your troubles. If you want, you can pay a FP to prevent the complication from happening, but we don’t recommend you do that very often— you’ll probably need that FP later, and getting compelled brings drama (and hence, fun) into your game’s story.
Players, you’re going to call for a compel when you want there to be a complication in a decision you’ve just made, if it’s related to one of your aspects. GMs will call for a compel to make the world respond to the characters in a complicated or dramatic way.
Anyone at the table is free to suggest when a compel might be appropriate for any character (including their own). GMs have the final word on whether or not a compel is valid.
Example:
Landon has the minor Hindrance 'Big Mouth'. It's clear to the player that Landon generally is unable to stop himself from saying what he thinks at inopportune times and so has chosen an aspect: 'The Manners of a Goat'.
Landon is attending a Grand Ball in The Reich with his friends, courtesy of the Imperial Court. The GM tells the players, “As you’re milling about, a sharply dressed young lady catches Landon sticking out of the crowd. She observes him for a while, then goes to engage him in conversation, obviously intrigued by how different he looks among all the stuffy nobles.” The GM turns to Landon's player. “What do you do?” The player says, “Uh… well, I guess I’ll ask her to dance and play along, see what I can find out about her.” The GM holds up a FP and says, “And is that going to go wrong, given Landon’s excellent command of courtly etiquette?” The player replies, “Yeah, I presume Landon will offend her pretty quickly, and that’ll get complicated. I’ll take the Fate Point.”
GM and player play a bit to figure out just how Landon puts his foot in his mouth, and then the GM describes some of the Imperial Guard showing up to challenge Landon's behaviour
. Things could go horribly wrong if he isn't careful about his answer….

Fate

Fornlönd Troy___